May 30, 2016

NYC HIT LIST- THE 8 BEST SHOWS NOW for BURO 24/7 AUSTRALIA

The urban jungle of New York City. A confusing web of concrete and exhilaration and sometimes a very overwhelming place to see art. Luckily I hit the pavements and did the hard yards for you to find the best (and most obscure) shows to see this (NYC) summer.

  1. Chelsea.
Now here’s the things with Chelsea…. don’t go on weekends! You will be met with a throng of tourists and you will never get anywhere. Want to see it like a true artsy New Yorker? Go on Thursday nights and get free champagne while you’re at it. This way you see the new shows (before the unknowing masses) that are opening for the week or fortnight. My top picks that will be up for a while are:

  1. Richard Serra at The Gagosian (May 7- July 29)
522 West 21st Street and 555 West 24th street.
Grandiose and overwhelming, Serra is a master of cutting both space and light. His extreme steel forms are static in their nature, yet you find yourself moving through space in awe, like never before.

  1. Anish Kapoor at Gladstone Gallery ‘Today You Will Be In Paradise’
 (May 4- June 11) 515 West 24th Street and 530 West 21st Street.
Globule is the (strange) word that comes to mind when describing this show. It's unusual, somewhat human and organic in nature and makes you cringe and wonder at the same time. Fill of metaphorical ideas, it’s tumultuous, visceral, very Kapoor, and is not to be missed. 

  1. Cindy Sherman at Metro Pictures (May 5-June 11)
529 West 24th Street.
Cindy is what I like to call a ‘character champion’. Creating different identities and personas, this show focuses on women in 1920’s Hollywood and is classically Sherman.

  1. James Turrell at Pace. ‘67 68 69’ (May 5- June 18)
534 West 25th Street and 32 East 57th Street
Turrell is certainly the master of light. It’s interesting what this can do to the human psyche. In the blue room we went into at this show, no one spoke…no one hardly even moved. This effect is so overwhelming you feel it in your whole being, which is exactly how art should move you.
  1. Juan Usle at Cheim & Read. ‘Membrana Porosa’ (May 5- June 18)
547 West 25th Street
One of the most incredible painting exhibitions I have seen for some time. Not only is the size impressive, but also Usle’s technique and composition is something I have never seen before. According to Cheim Read Gallery: “broad brushstrokes comprising these bands are based on the artist’s pulse—in an interview with John Yau for the Brooklyn Rail, he describes his “sequential field or territory of marks” as a “cardiogram.” If so, it is a cardiogram that is ruptured, torn, and tattered.”

  1. Manus x Machina, Fashion in the Age of Technology at The Met
(Showing now till August 14th) 1000 5th Avenue.
The Manus (hand) and Machina (Machine) are the obvious focus for this show and the dichotomy between the two makes for an incredible exhibition. If you have even the slightest interest in fashion this show is an absolute knock out. It is fantastically laid out and expertly curated- a mean feat with over 170 outfits to show.

  1. Edgar Degas ‘A Strange New Beauty’ at The MoMA
(Showing now till July 24th) 11 West 53rd Street
Those of you who think you know Degas, think again. This show will blow your mind in terms of how his career originated and progressed. The depths of his imagination, innovation and originality are far from the beautiful dancers you normally see from him. He touched on the voyeuristic and darkly candid elements of society yet could go right back to whimsical pastels of ballerinas. It’s an epic show full of extreme talent and relentless experimentation.

  1. ‘Human Interest: Portraits from The Whitney Collection’ at The Whitney.
(April 27 2016-Feb 12 2017). 99 Gansevoort Street
From a giant burning candle of Julian Schnabel to a work representing the skin colour of all the artists in the museum, this show is broad in style yet concentrated in theme. Every piece in this show represents human interest (whatever that may be), so the ideas on this are vast, the materials differ, but in essence, we are all one. 
Original article available at Buro 24/7 Australia

Follow me on Instagram at @thefincollection and @amy_fin for up to date images and Periscope TV (amy_fin) for live streaming of all shows!

April 26, 2016

AMY FINLAYSON for SABA WINTER 2016

What does the SABA Winter_16 campaign mean to you?
I am honoured to be a part of this campaign! This really signifies the fusion of so many years of modelling with my new creative career as an artist. I love that Saba is embracing this country's young creatives - hopefully this will inspire others to follow their passions.
How did you incorporate your look into SABA style?
I loved being able to incorporate my style into this campaign. The pieces are so easy to mix up and the silhouettes emulate the classic nature of my dressing.
Describe your own style in 3 words.
Classic. Creative. Quirky
Do you have a favourite piece of clothing or accessory?
14kt gold and rose gold bracelets from my mother. They were a birthday present for my 22nd birthday and I hardly ever take them off - one constant in my ever-changing life.
What inspires your individual style?
The base of my dressing is simple and practical as comfort is a big factor in my daily life. I do however like to stand out and add a creative touch whether this be through an interesting silhouette or accessory.
Who is your style inspiration?
No one in particular- I find a lot of inspiration though various street style imagery and social media and work from there.
What was your favourite era in fashion?
90s for sure! With the 70s in a close second. I feel that the 90s had such a strong vibe behind it that came through in people’s attitudes and the way they dressed and carried themselves. This is the same with the 70s, but the cuts were much more flattering.
What about this city inspires your sense of style?
It has been said time and time again, but the laid back life style really influences how people dress here. Minimal, simple and casual. Effortless coastal chic.
What do you think is unique to Sydney in terms of style?
We have such a unique combination of city, harbour and coastline which makes for casual and practical dressing, with a unique twist of sport-luxe and summer styles.
Do you think you can tell anything about a person based on their style?
Definitely. Dressing can be an outward reflection of an internal disposition- well that's how I like to think of it anyway...!
What does your style say about you?
I wear many hats, so it really depends on the day and the job. Art show? Sophistication and balanced creativity. Painting day? Comfort and efficiency. Gallery day? Class and Style. Modelling? Classic with a twist.
What do you think others take away from your style?
Hopefully a fresh take on classic forms.
How does your work influence your style or vice versa?
I like to keep it quite classic when I dress- there is so much happening visually when I am researching shows and painting, I try and keep the palette simple, in order to put more emphasis on the works.
What do you like about living in your city?
You can be a million different people in Sydney. Bikini, light shirt and slides one day, tailored suiting and a heel the next. It really depends on what you want to get up to in this beautiful urban playground. It truly is a beautiful city that has so much to offer- visually it's stunning and it really is a great place to grow up.
Is your style static or do you mix it up?
I definitely mix it up. Comfort is number one, but if I am feeling it I will push the boundaries a bit depending on what's going on in my head.
Your style advice?
Don't dress for anyone else.
What is your favourite city?
A close tie between Sydney and New York.
- See more at: http://www.saba.com.au/SABA_winter_2016_campaign_Amy_Page.html#sthash.GmN2WK3k.dpuf

What do you think of this SABA campaign and what does it mean to you?
I am honoured to be a part of this campaign! This really signifies the fusion of so many years of modelling with my new creative career as an artist. I love that Saba is embracing this county's young creatives-hopefully this will inspire others to follow their passions.

Describe your own style in 3 words.
Classic. Creative. Quirky

What’s your favourite piece of clothing / accessories?
14kt gold and rose gold bracelets from my mother. They were a birthday present for my 22nd birthday and I hardly ever take them off- one constant in my ever changing life.

What inspires you in your style and individual look?
The base of my dressing is simple and practical as comfort is a big factor in my daily life. I do however like to stand out and add a creative touch whether this be through an interesting silhouette or accessory.

Who’s your style inspiration?
No one in particular- I find a lot of inspiration though various street style imagery and social media and work from there.

What was your favourite era in fashion and why?
90's for sure! With the 70's in a close second. I feel that the 90's had such a strong vibe behind it that came through in peoples attitudes and they way they dressed and carried themselves. This is the same with the 70's, but the cuts were much more flattering.

What about this city inspires your sense of style?
It has been said time and time again, but the laid back life style really influences how people dress here. Minimal, simple and casual. Effortless coastal chic.

What do you think is unique to Sydney/Australia in terms of style?
We have such a unique combination of city, harbour and coastline which makes for casual and practical dressing, with a unique twist of sport luxe and summer styles.

Do you think you can tell anything about a person based on their style?
Definitely. Dressing [can be] an outward reflection of an internal disposition- well that's how I like to think of it anyway...!

What are you trying to say with your style?
I wear many hats, so it really depends on the day and the job. Art show? Sophistication and balanced creativity. Painting day? Comfort and efficiency. Gallery day? Class and Style. Modelling? Classic with a twist.

What do you think others take away from your style?
Hopefully a fresh take on classic forms

How does your work influence your style or vice versa?
I like to keep it quite classic when I dress- there is so much happening visually when I am researching shows and painting, I try and keep the palette simple, in order to put more emphasis on the works.

What do you like about living in your city? In general and in relation to style.
You can be a million different people in Sydney. Bikini, light shirt and slides one day, tailored suiting and a heel the next. It really depends on what you want to get up to in this beautiful urban playground. It truly is a beautiful city that has so much to offer- visually it's stunning and it really is a great place to grow up.

Is your style static or do you mix it up based on your mood/events/time of day?
I definitely mix it up. Comfort is number one, but if I am feeling it I will push the boundaries a bit depending on what's going on in my head.

Can you offer your style advice in 5 words or less?
Don't dress for anyone else.

What is your favourite city?
A close tie between Sydney and New York.
International model turned mixed media photographer, Finlayson creates an aesthetic that is uniquely her own. This form of self expression pushes the boundaries of contemporary art most unconventionally.

Describe your own style in 3 words: Classic. Creative. Quirky

What’s your favourite piece of clothing or accessories? 14kt gold and rose gold bracelets from my mother.

What about the city inspires your sense of style? It has been said time and time again, but the laid back lifestyle really influences how people dress here. Minimal, simple and casual. Effortless coastal chic.

Can you offer your style advice in 5 words or less? Don't dress for anyone else.

How does your work influence your style or vice versa? I like to keep it quite classic when I dress - there is so much happening visually when I am researching shows and painting, I try and keep the palette simple, in order to put more emphasis on the works. - See more at: http://www.saba.com.au/SABA_winter_2016_campaign.html#sthash.RZdihCdh.dpuf
International model turned mixed media photographer, Amy Finlayson creates a unique aesthetic; a form of self-expression that pushes the boundaries of contemporary art most unconventionally. She cites the combination of materials with the classic and progressive, the shape and silhouette, the colour and texture.


- See more at: http://www.saba.com.au/SABA_winter_2016_campaign_Amy_Page.html#Amy_Video
s your favourite city?
What does the SABA Winter_16 campaign mean to you?
I am honoured to be a part of this campaign! This really signifies the fusion of so many years of modelling with my new creative career as an artist. I love that Saba is embracing this country's young creatives - hopefully this will inspire others to follow their passions.
How did you incorporate your look into SABA style?
I loved being able to incorporate my style into this campaign. The pieces are so easy to mix up and the silhouettes emulate the classic nature of my dressing.
Describe your own style in 3 words.
Classic. Creative. Quirky
Do you have a favourite piece of clothing or accessory?
14kt gold and rose gold bracelets from my mother. They were a birthday present for my 22nd birthday and I hardly ever take them off - one constant in my ever-changing life.
What inspires your individual style?
The base of my dressing is simple and practical as comfort is a big factor in my daily life. I do however like to stand out and add a creative touch whether this be through an interesting silhouette or accessory.
Who is your style inspiration?
No one in particular- I find a lot of inspiration though various street style imagery and social media and work from there.
What was your favourite era in fashion?
90s for sure! With the 70s in a close second. I feel that the 90s had such a strong vibe behind it that came through in people’s attitudes and the way they dressed and carried themselves. This is the same with the 70s, but the cuts were much more flattering.
What about this city inspires your sense of style?
It has been said time and time again, but the laid back life style really influences how people dress here. Minimal, simple and casual. Effortless coastal chic.
What do you think is unique to Sydney in terms of style?
We have such a unique combination of city, harbour and coastline which makes for casual and practical dressing, with a unique twist of sport-luxe and summer styles.
Do you think you can tell anything about a person based on their style?
Definitely. Dressing can be an outward reflection of an internal disposition- well that's how I like to think of it anyway...!
What does your style say about you?
I wear many hats, so it really depends on the day and the job. Art show? Sophistication and balanced creativity. Painting day? Comfort and efficiency. Gallery day? Class and Style. Modelling? Classic with a twist.
What do you think others take away from your style?
Hopefully a fresh take on classic forms.
How does your work influence your style or vice versa?
I like to keep it quite classic when I dress- there is so much happening visually when I am researching shows and painting, I try and keep the palette simple, in order to put more emphasis on the works.
What do you like about living in your city?
You can be a million different people in Sydney. Bikini, light shirt and slides one day, tailored suiting and a heel the next. It really depends on what you want to get up to in this beautiful urban playground. It truly is a beautiful city that has so much to offer- visually it's stunning and it really is a great place to grow up.
Is your style static or do you mix it up?
I definitely mix it up. Comfort is number one, but if I am feeling it I will push the boundaries a bit depending on what's going on in my head.
Your style advice?
Don't dress for anyone else.
What is your favourite city?
A close tie between Sydney and New York.
- See more at: http://www.saba.com.au/SABA_winter_2016_campaign_Amy_Page.html#Amy_Video
What does the SABA Winter_16 campaign mean to you?
I am honoured to be a part of this campaign! This really signifies the fusion of so many years of modelling with my new creative career as an artist. I love that Saba is embracing this country's young creatives - hopefully this will inspire others to follow their passions.
How did you incorporate your look into SABA style?
I loved being able to incorporate my style into this campaign. The pieces are so easy to mix up and the silhouettes emulate the classic nature of my dressing.
Describe your own style in 3 words.
Classic. Creative. Quirky
Do you have a favourite piece of clothing or accessory?
14kt gold and rose gold bracelets from my mother. They were a birthday present for my 22nd birthday and I hardly ever take them off - one constant in my ever-changing life.
What inspires your individual style?
The base of my dressing is simple and practical as comfort is a big factor in my daily life. I do however like to stand out and add a creative touch whether this be through an interesting silhouette or accessory.
Who is your style inspiration?
No one in particular- I find a lot of inspiration though various street style imagery and social media and work from there.
What was your favourite era in fashion?
90s for sure! With the 70s in a close second. I feel that the 90s had such a strong vibe behind it that came through in people’s attitudes and the way they dressed and carried themselves. This is the same with the 70s, but the cuts were much more flattering.
What about this city inspires your sense of style?
It has been said time and time again, but the laid back life style really influences how people dress here. Minimal, simple and casual. Effortless coastal chic.
What do you think is unique to Sydney in terms of style?
We have such a unique combination of city, harbour and coastline which makes for casual and practical dressing, with a unique twist of sport-luxe and summer styles.
Do you think you can tell anything about a person based on their style?
Definitely. Dressing can be an outward reflection of an internal disposition- well that's how I like to think of it anyway...!
What does your style say about you?
I wear many hats, so it really depends on the day and the job. Art show? Sophistication and balanced creativity. Painting day? Comfort and efficiency. Gallery day? Class and Style. Modelling? Classic with a twist.
What do you think others take away from your style?
Hopefully a fresh take on classic forms.
How does your work influence your style or vice versa?
I like to keep it quite classic when I dress- there is so much happening visually when I am researching shows and painting, I try and keep the palette simple, in order to put more emphasis on the works.
What do you like about living in your city?
You can be a million different people in Sydney. Bikini, light shirt and slides one day, tailored suiting and a heel the next. It really depends on what you want to get up to in this beautiful urban playground. It truly is a beautiful city that has so much to offer- visually it's stunning and it really is a great place to grow up.
Is your style static or do you mix it up?
I definitely mix it up. Comfort is number one, but if I am feeling it I will push the boundaries a bit depending on what's going on in my head.
Your style advice?
Don't dress for anyone else.
What is your favourite city?
A close tie between Sydney and New York.
- See more at: http://www.saba.com.au/SABA_winter_2016_campaign_Amy_Page.html#Amy_Video
What does the SABA Winter_16 campaign mean to you?
I am honoured to be a part of this campaign! This really signifies the fusion of so many years of modelling with my new creative career as an artist. I love that Saba is embracing this country's young creatives - hopefully this will inspire others to follow their passions.
How did you incorporate your look into SABA style?
I loved being able to incorporate my style into this campaign. The pieces are so easy to mix up and the silhouettes emulate the classic nature of my dressing.
Describe your own style in 3 words.
Classic. Creative. Quirky
Do you have a favourite piece of clothing or accessory?
14kt gold and rose gold bracelets from my mother. They were a birthday present for my 22nd birthday and I hardly ever take them off - one constant in my ever-changing life.
What inspires your individual style?
The base of my dressing is simple and practical as comfort is a big factor in my daily life. I do however like to stand out and add a creative touch whether this be through an interesting silhouette or accessory.
Who is your style inspiration?
No one in particular- I find a lot of inspiration though various street style imagery and social media and work from there.
What was your favourite era in fashion?
90s for sure! With the 70s in a close second. I feel that the 90s had such a strong vibe behind it that came through in people’s attitudes and the way they dressed and carried themselves. This is the same with the 70s, but the cuts were much more flattering.
What about this city inspires your sense of style?
It has been said time and time again, but the laid back life style really influences how people dress here. Minimal, simple and casual. Effortless coastal chic.
What do you think is unique to Sydney in terms of style?
We have such a unique combination of city, harbour and coastline which makes for casual and practical dressing, with a unique twist of sport-luxe and summer styles.
Do you think you can tell anything about a person based on their style?
Definitely. Dressing can be an outward reflection of an internal disposition- well that's how I like to think of it anyway...!
What does your style say about you?
I wear many hats, so it really depends on the day and the job. Art show? Sophistication and balanced creativity. Painting day? Comfort and efficiency. Gallery day? Class and Style. Modelling? Classic with a twist.
What do you think others take away from your style?
Hopefully a fresh take on classic forms.
How does your work influence your style or vice versa?
I like to keep it quite classic when I dress- there is so much happening visually when I am researching shows and painting, I try and keep the palette simple, in order to put more emphasis on the works.
What do you like about living in your city?
You can be a million different people in Sydney. Bikini, light shirt and slides one day, tailored suiting and a heel the next. It really depends on what you want to get up to in this beautiful urban playground. It truly is a beautiful city that has so much to offer- visually it's stunning and it really is a great place to grow up.
Is your style static or do you mix it up?
I definitely mix it up. Comfort is number one, but if I am feeling it I will push the boundaries a bit depending on what's going on in my head.
Your style advice?
Don't dress for anyone else.
What is your favourite city?
A close tie between Sydney and New York.
- See more at: http://www.saba.com.au/SABA_winter_2016_campaign_Amy_Page.html#sthash.QArI7zLK.dpuf
What does the SABA Winter_16 campaign mean to you?
I am honoured to be a part of this campaign! This really signifies the fusion of so many years of modelling with my new creative career as an artist. I love that Saba is embracing this country's young creatives - hopefully this will inspire others to follow their passions.
How did you incorporate your look into SABA style?
I loved being able to incorporate my style into this campaign. The pieces are so easy to mix up and the silhouettes emulate the classic nature of my dressing.
Describe your own style in 3 words.
Classic. Creative. Quirky
Do you have a favourite piece of clothing or accessory?
14kt gold and rose gold bracelets from my mother. They were a birthday present for my 22nd birthday and I hardly ever take them off - one constant in my ever-changing life.
What inspires your individual style?
The base of my dressing is simple and practical as comfort is a big factor in my daily life. I do however like to stand out and add a creative touch whether this be through an interesting silhouette or accessory.
Who is your style inspiration?
No one in particular- I find a lot of inspiration though various street style imagery and social media and work from there.
What was your favourite era in fashion?
90s for sure! With the 70s in a close second. I feel that the 90s had such a strong vibe behind it that came through in people’s attitudes and the way they dressed and carried themselves. This is the same with the 70s, but the cuts were much more flattering.
What about this city inspires your sense of style?
It has been said time and time again, but the laid back life style really influences how people dress here. Minimal, simple and casual. Effortless coastal chic.
What do you think is unique to Sydney in terms of style?
We have such a unique combination of city, harbour and coastline which makes for casual and practical dressing, with a unique twist of sport-luxe and summer styles.
Do you think you can tell anything about a person based on their style?
Definitely. Dressing can be an outward reflection of an internal disposition- well that's how I like to think of it anyway...!
What does your style say about you?
I wear many hats, so it really depends on the day and the job. Art show? Sophistication and balanced creativity. Painting day? Comfort and efficiency. Gallery day? Class and Style. Modelling? Classic with a twist.
What do you think others take away from your style?
Hopefully a fresh take on classic forms.
How does your work influence your style or vice versa?
I like to keep it quite classic when I dress- there is so much happening visually when I am researching shows and painting, I try and keep the palette simple, in order to put more emphasis on the works.
What do you like about living in your city?
You can be a million different people in Sydney. Bikini, light shirt and slides one day, tailored suiting and a heel the next. It really depends on what you want to get up to in this beautiful urban playground. It truly is a beautiful city that has so much to offer- visually it's stunning and it really is a great place to grow up.
Is your style static or do you mix it up?
I definitely mix it up. Comfort is number one, but if I am feeling it I will push the boundaries a bit depending on what's going on in my head.
Your style advice?
Don't dress for anyone else.
What is your favourite city?
A close tie between Sydney and New York.
- See more at: http://www.saba.com.au/SABA_winter_2016_campaign_Amy_Page.html#sthash.QArI7zLK.dpuf

March 15, 2016

GIRLS ON CARS- BEHIND THE SCENES


Way too many selfies in exercise gear, tantrums, a million cups of coffee, spilled paint, yours truly crying over spilled paint, momets of glory and then some more mistakes. It's definitely not a glam experience in the lead up to an art show. Check out my journey below...

My studio at home is quite small, so luckily my friend and fellow artist Daimon Downey let me use his space for the first printing of my girls. This photo is of the first printing session with the works laid out to dry. I have an amazing printer (Charring Cross Photo) that helped me get all these photos ready. They are printed on a heavy cotton rag paper that was able to withhold the watery layers of paint. Pic by me.

Marbled pants and marbled paintings! The works are created by printing photographs I have taken (on 120mm film), in a cocktail of water and paint. This can be quite tricky, as I can't see where the paint is being applied, so sometimes they need to be redone. It's a chaotic way of painting, but the final result is full of expression and detail. Once the works are dry, I go over the paint with lead and white pencil to accentuate the detailing. Pic by me.

Hang day! This hang was somewhat difficult due to the recessed wall, but once my good friend and I got the first few up, the rest fell into place nicely. I laid all the works out in front of the wall prior to drilling, just to make sure the works all flowed together nicely.
There are 3 triptychs (Frankie, Dani and Rebecca) and 2 diptychs (Luci and Lydia) in the show that needed to be hung together, so it was a matter of figuring out where the single works should be placed around them. Pic by me.

Friends Carlie Philby and Ksenija Lukich joined the celebrations on the night. Pic by @attilaszilvasiphotography

Fellow artist and friend Dina Broadhurst. Pic by @attilaszilvasiphotography

Hotel Centennial
Pic by Bela Rofe

For additional sales details please email info@thefincollection.com or visit www.thefincollection.com

January 19, 2016

INTERVIEW AND ARTWORK for LAUD MAGAZINE




Reinvention is an art form in itself. Australian model Amy Finlayson has begun her transition from high fashion to fine art. We played mixed medium with the platinum blonde – translating her work whilst getting to know the creativity behind the beauty.

First of all, how did you become a model?
The Vivien’s Live City Face Model Search

What are some of your career highlights?
Italian Vogue with Steven Meisel, Italain Vogue with Steven Klein, French Vogue with David Sims, Benetton with David Sims, Another Magazine with Mikael Jansson….and many many MANY other incredible editorials I will be proudly showing off to my Grandchildren.

What piece of advice would you give to your younger self now?
Relax and enjoy the ride more. If anything, I look back and feel I didn’t soak the experiences up enough.

Did you feel like you grew up fast because of the nature of the industry?
Yes most certainly. I feel that I am almost regressing in maturity sometimes. Having to be so professional and focused at 17 can be difficult, yet it has shaped the woman I am today- determined, intuitive and focused.

What is your first memory of art?
The very first is painting in kindergarten. I used to take home my works and my proud parents plastered the dining room with my scribbles.

When did you begin to think about exploring the path of an artist?
I had a bit of a crisis at 21…modelling was slowing down, inevitably, and no one warned me that there was this point in your early 20’s where you really really had to think about the rest of your life, post modelling. I decided to start by studying my passion. I got hooked on the creative process in high school where I would spend my lunch times finishing projects between modelling jobs. It was such an exhilarating experience creating something beautiful from scratch and I knew I needed to regain that passion.

Did you find people were skeptical in the beginning?
Not to my face, but I am sure people have skeptical opinions. Models have a strong stereotype, and its also not the easiest thing being a woman in the arts, so the odds are against me, but I really am determined to get push through it all and create a business I am proud of.

What’s been the hardest part about the transition?
Associating with a new identity. Ever since I turned 13 I have been a model with someone telling me where to go and what to do, but changing professions so early on in life has been somewhat challenging as I am making a lot of this up as I go.

Which artists have inspired you on the journey so far?
Definitely Quentin Jones as she was also a model, and has a unique style that is influenced by fashion, yet not consumed by it.

What advice would you give to other models looking to pursue interests outside of the industry?
Start early. Modelling is so flexible so use your down time well to get ahead- everyone else is already forging on in their professions full time, so take this time to combine all your strengths to make an amazing future for yourself.

What do you think makes good art?
Passion.

What drives you to create?
I can’t name it, but it’s definitely innate and non-negotiable.
There is a piece of me, a voice, an expression, that needs to be shown or else it just feels like I am cheating myself by not doing what makes me happy, and if someone else likes it too, well, that’s an absolute bonus and a fantastic win win situation.
Photographer Thom Kerr. Body paint and makeup Becca Gilmartin. Hair by Luke. Artwork by me.

Thank you to Laud Magazine for a great interview. 

NEWS | AMY FINLAYSON FOR STM MAGAZINE, PERTH WA


Photographer: Margaret Zhang Hair: Paloma Rose Garcai. Makeup: Chris King.

A huge thank you to The STM for a lovely write up.

January 3, 2016

'ART INSPIRED' for BURO 24/7 AUSTRALIA

As you can probably tell from my last article, I love a good pairing, and this festive season is no exception. This time, I've matched some key holiday and event outfits with some amazing art-inspired gift ideas - all available in and around Sydney. Happy shopping!

1. Kacey Devlin dress, from tuchuzy.com.au and Temps Des Reves Bondi Beach towel, tempsdesreves.com
Art inspired: Amy Finalyson's last-minute gift ideas
Shiny, silky blends you want to wrap yourself up and live in forever? Available from both Kacey Devlin and Adrian Mesko (the brainchild behind Temps Des Reves).


2. Ellery top and pants, from davidjones.com.au and 'Ellery' Red-browed Finch by Leila Jeffreys from Olsen Irwin gallery

Art inspired: Amy Finalyson's last-minute gift ideas
Pops of red are perfect for the silly season and right now it's all about texture. Whether velvet or feathers, make sure you have a smack of red in your stocking.

3. Eyes of Mine Handkerchief by Yayoi Kusama from store.mca.com.au and Tome dress, from davidjones.com.au 
Art inspired: Amy Finalyson's last-minute gift ideas
Crisp blues and clean whites are classic staples for summer festivities. Thanks to the reinvented share (care of the Tome boys) this striped shift dress is your next wardrobe winner. Extend the blue hues to the kitchen and freshen up your decor with this Yayoi Kusama tea towel - a great gift idea for the art-savvy among your friends.


4. Aje dress, a-j-e.com.au and Wayne at the Pool (1969) by John Witzig, from dickersongallery.com.au 
Art inspired: Amy Finalyson's last-minute gift ideas
Dappled shadows, bodies of water and fond memories are Witzig staples. Echo these iconic moments in time with a backless lace number by Aje, plunging in all the right ways, just like Witzig's subjects, and perfect for party time this New Year's Eve.

5. Whitey by Aquabumps, aquabumps.com and Acler dress, from tuchuzy.com.au
Art inspired: Amy Finalyson's last-minute gift ideas
Who doesn't love the iconic landscape and imagery of Australia? Or Bondi Beach for that matter? Aussie-based label Acler has immortalised the arches of the Opera House in this incredible one-shouldered number. This exceptional tailored dress also comes in black, and Uge's Aquabumps images also come in a rainbow of hues - good luck choosing between them all!


6. Self Portrait dress, from tuchuzy.com.au and Sidewalk Surfer, Huntington Beach (1976) by Hugh Holland print, from blendergallery.com
Art inspired: Amy Finalyson's last-minute gift ideas
Sun-drenched summers in suburbia, barefoot walks to the beach and barbeques with friends - some summers never change. Capture this essence with a bit of flair in a strapless Self Portrait dress and immortalise an endless summer with this sepia filled print from Blender Gallery.

November 17, 2015

'THERE'S A BEAST IN BALI' for KULTURE


I recently was lucky enough to go on holiday to Bali. After ample time sipping cocktails by the pool I figured I should probably get some work done, so I spent the evening drinking cider in the awesome venue that is ‘The Temple of Enthusiasm’ at Deus X Machina, Bali. Horrid life, I know.
‘What on earth does this have to o with art?’ I hear you asking…well kind reader, actually a lot…

Relocating to Canggu, Bali, from Sydney, Australia, with his wife and 2 little boys in June this year, Brad Eastman, aka Beastman, has embraced the laid back lifestyle, ‘weather, slow pace, affordability, help with the kids and there is a real positive and friendly vibe here’, and it shows in his work, too.

Despite not really having a huge exhibition space, the gallery at Deus X Machina hummed with this geometric vibrancy and refined rainbows in his solo show ‘It’s All Around You’. A departure from his earlier, larger, street art focused works, this show deals with how the Balinese lifestyle has impacted and shaped both him and his works. Smaller, cultivated pieces were on display, with a central focus on the land and a kind, respectful nod to the people and their culture.

I emailed Brad shortly after the show to catch up…



A:  Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on now, have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after moving here?
B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition 'It's All Around You' I wanted to create a body of work that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka and Ellis Ericson.


A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?
B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?
B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope Miami in December, and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.


A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives etc. But that's all good…it's all part of growing as an artist, trying new mediums etc.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever the project is. I will usually find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. Was recently in Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals last month. The rest of this year will see me mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions, we work with artists to create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia for later in the year, some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more murals while here in Bali, just for fun!

Check out the Kulture version here
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works. - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/pulseEdit.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.6eiqQYJ4.dpuf
A visit to the ‘The Temple of Enthusiasm’ at Deus X Machina in Bali revealed a new exhibition by Brad Eastman, aka Beastman. After relocating to Canggu, Bali from Sydney, Australia with his family in June this year, he has embraced a new, laid back lifestyle.

The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun!
- See more at: http://kulture.com/site/pulseEdit.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.6eiqQYJ4.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.
- See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.HNJmxGHN.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun! - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.HNJmxGHN.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun! - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.pcDORl9j.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun! - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.pcDORl9j.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun! - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.pcDORl9j.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun! - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.pcDORl9j.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun! - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.Bzis0rtj.dpuf
The gallery space at Deus X Machina, while not vast, hummed with the geometric
vibrancy and refined rainbows in Beastman’s show It’s All Around You. A departure
from his earlier street art focused works, this show deals with how his newly embraced
Balinese lifestyle has shaped both him and his works.

I caught up with Beastman after his exhibition in September to find out more about
the exhibition and his art practice.

A: Your work is shifting in subject matter to reflect the culture and island you live on
now. Have there been any other shifts in the way you work and what you paint after
moving here?

B: My work has recently taken a shift toward further abstraction and geometric forms
inspired by nature and landscape. For this exhibition I wanted to create a body of work
that reflected what I saw here in Canggu. All the paintings are based on the
surrounding landscape, people, industry, customs and cultures. You can’t help but be
inspired by your surroundings while traveling and being somewhere other than your
comfort zone.

A: Where is your studio?
B: I am currently working out of a studio space in Canggu sharing with Mia Taninaka
and Ellis Ericson.

A: What is the art community like here in Bali as opposed to Sydney? Do you feel
there is more camaraderie in Bali as its a smaller community?

B: I haven’t immersed myself in the art community so much, just met some of the
mural and graffiti artists that are based here. Everyone I have met so far has been
super nice and happy to meet up.

A: Who are some other notable artists living and working in Bali?
B: I have met a few other artists based here including Australian artists Mia Taninaka
and Andrew Wellman.

A: Do you find it difficult to adjust to the market here in Bali as opposed to Sydney (in
regards to selling work/ shipping work back to Sydney)?

B: I'm still doing everything the same, just basing myself here. I don’t think there is
much of an art market here, almost all the work I will create here is for exhibitions I
already had planned in Australia and overseas. Currently working on pieces for Scope
Miami in December and then an exhibition in Detroit in 2016.

A: What challenges come with painting in Bali, if any?
B: The quality of art supplies is lower, you can’t get some products I usually use to
make my work, so I’m having to just compromise and use alternatives. But that's all
okay as it's all part of growing as an artist.

A: How often do you commute back to Sydney?
B: Not so much just to Sydney, I travel to wherever my next project is. I will usually
find myself somewhere in Australia every couple of months though. I was recently in
Maryborough QLD and Hobart TAS painting murals. The rest of this year will see me
mostly in Bali but also Perth, Sydney and Bunbury.

A: Who and what would you say are you greatest influencers and inspirations?
B: I am most inspired by the future and everything that is amazing in nature. One of
my biggest influences growing up making art is Don Pendleton.

A: Any other projects you are working on here?
B: Currently working on our business called East Editions. We work with artists to
create limited edition products. Also working on some bigger things back in Australia
for later in the year and some paintings for Scope Miami with 1xRun and some other
ongoing projects with The Opening Hours. I definitely want to try paint a few more
murals while here in Bali, just for fun! - See more at: http://kulture.com/site/item.cfm?item=D381F07DE11CEDF150B1D1FF5637700C#sthash.Bzis0rtj.dpuf

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